3D Prints Not Sticking to Bed? 4 Easy Fixes to Bed Adhesion

3D Prints Not Sticking to Bed? 4 Easy Fixes to Bed Adhesion

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3D Prints Not Sticking To Bed? 4 Easy Fixes To Bed Adhesion

Are you having trouble with 3D prints not sticking to the bed? Here are 4 easy fixes to get your filament to stick to your bed and solve your bed adhesion problems. We'll be using a Creality Ender 3 in this guide for reference, but these tips apply to any filament 3D printer! By the end of this, you'll be a first layer and bed adhesion expert!

  • Proper leveling
  • Proper Temperatures
  • First Layer Settings
  • Upgrade Your Build Surface

Poor Bed Leveling

While this may seem obvious, it is the number one factor in getting good adhesion. Without good leveling, you'll never get a good first layer that can keep your 3D print stuck to the bed. Many different variables play into leveling a bed, but you can use the pictured references below to tell if your leveling is perfect or needs some work.

Incorrect Printing Temperature

Another big one is finding the best combination of temperatures for your materials. Most materials come with manufacturer recommendations, but don't be afraid to stray away from those if you feel like you'll get better results. Temperatures will vary based on several factors, so there is no silver bullet we can recommend. However, these are the ranges we recommend trying for each material:

  • PLA Filament
    • Hotend Temperature: 200-220°C
    • Bed Temperature: 50-70°C
  • PETG Filament
    • Hotend Temperature: 220-245°C
    • Bed Temperature: 75-90°C
  • ABS Filament
    • Hotend Temperature: 235-265°C
    • Bed Temperature: 100-120°C
  • Nylon Filament
    • Hotend Temperature: 245-265°C
    • Bed Temperature: 100-120°C
  • TPU Filament
    • Hotend Temperature: 220-250°C
    • Bed Temperature: 40-60°C

 

The Best First Layer Settings

Filament not sticking to the bed is the most common failure point for newcomers to 3D printing. First layer adhesion can be difficult but is also the most essential layer of any 3D print. A bad first layer (even if successful) can cause your print to come off the bed before the print is over. So spend your time on this, and make sure to fine-tune your slicer settings. Here are the best first layer slicer settings to tune.

    • First layer height
    • First layer width
    • First Layer Speed
    • Turning off your part cooling fan

The Best First Layer Height

Regardless of your printing layer height, we recommend printing an initial layer height of 0.30mm. This large initial layer height gives the first layer enough plastic to create a firm grip on your 3D printer's bed. Most slicers allow you to set a different first layer height than regular printing layer height, allowing you to still print whatever resolution layer height you want for the rest of the print.

The Best First Layer Width

Along with a larger first layer height, we recommend a wider first layer width. We print with an initial layer width of 125%, increasing each line's surface area to interact with the bed. We use the setting of 125% regardless of printing material and go back to a 100% width for the rest of the print.

The Best First Layer Speed

The first layer speed changes from material to material, but it never hurts to start slower than needed. We recommend a good first layer speed of 20mm/s to ensure good adhesion. As you get better at printing and your settings become more fine-tuned, you can start turning up the speed. Just don't forget, the first layer is the most critical layer. So running at slower speeds to get a better print success rate saves you more time than just printing a faster first layer.

The Best Part Cooling Fan Settings

While the part cooling fan goes a long way in helping your prints capture detail and printing successful structures like bridges & overhangs, it can be detrimental to your first layer. Most print surfaces rely on heat to help the filament stick to the bed and are designed to release the print when the surface is cooled. Having your part cooling fan on during the first few layers can cause your bed to cool and release the filament rather than sticking down the print. That's why we recommend turning it off for the first 3 to 5 layers. Most slicers have a setting that allows you to set variable fan power at different layers.

Upgrade Your Build Surface

Aside from optimizing your slicer settings and bed leveling, build surfaces play a huge role in helping promote adhesion. A PEI flex plate, like Fula-Flex 2.0, provides coatings specifically formulated for 3D printing and increased bed adhesion for materials like PLA, PETG, ABS, TPU, & Nylon. Along with the excellent adhesive properties of PEI, magnetic spring steel flex plates make it easier to remove parts from the build plate post-print. So if you have issues with your 3D Prints sticking to your bed, this kills two birds with one stone. You can learn more about different build surfaces and their advantages by reading "FDM Build Surface Comparison" 

The Wrap-Up

This article should equip you with all the tools needed for perfect part adhesion. Have different tips that you use? Let us know about them in the comments! Still have adhesion issue questions? Text us at 833-287-9183 for free troubleshooting!

1 comment

Rufus

Rufus

Having a well maintained and clean machine is also important for high precision equipment.

I like to clean the build plate before each print. Generally with plain soap and water.

Having a well maintained and clean machine is also important for high precision equipment.

I like to clean the build plate before each print. Generally with plain soap and water.

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